Pipeline creates a “platinum employer” in Superior

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Infrastructure, Oil Sands, Wisconsin

Those who think the oil and natural gas industry isn’t really that important in Wisconsin should check with the people who live in Superior. Since 1950 an Enbridge pipeline that delivers crude oil to U.S. refineries has been the driving source of family-wage jobs for many people in that Wisconsin community.

Here’s a video of Andy Lisak, the chief administrator for Douglas County, talking about the pipeline’s economic impact and the jobs supported by the ongoing project.

Take note of this specific comment from Lisak: “…the quality of these jobs, from engineers to accountants to skilled tradespeople at the terminal, is very good. These are family-type jobs with benefits.”

You can check out this press release to get the whole story of the pipeline operation in Superior. It’s another great example of how the U.S. oil and natural gas industry benefits so many American communities.

xx

Leave your thoughts

EPA chief McCarthy is right on Keystone XL, but doesn't go far enough

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Keystone XL Pipeline, National, Oil Sands

You might have seen recent news reports of EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy’s statement that the Keystone XL pipeline would not – as critics have long avowed – be a “disaster for the climate.”

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce agreed with her comments, but didn’t think she went as far as she could have on that line of thought. They pointed out the evidence that shows that Keystone XL, in addition to having no significant impact on the environment, is the best alternative to transporting North American crude oil.

Their argument makes sense. As Chamber research shows, pipelines are one of the safest and cleanest ways to transport oil and natural gas.

Energy Citizens appreciates Administrator McCarthy’s statement about Keystone XL. And, like the Chamber, we hope that President Obama will listen to her, take a hard look at the facts, and give this pipeline the approval it deserves.

xx

Leave your thoughts

A Good Vote on the Keystone XL Pipeline

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Keystone XL Pipeline, Minnesota, Oil Sands

When Congress considered legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline, Rep. Rick Nolan joined with a bipartisan majority to support this much-needed project. In the pages of the Park Rapids Enterprise, David Collins expresses his appreciation for this vote:

I should add that the Keystone project itself would support some 40,000 good jobs throughout the central United States – and operate under strict EPA rules and regulations. I commend Congressman Nolan for his sensible position on pipelines in general, and on Keystone in particular. And I would hope that this position and support would extend to the proposed Sandpiper and Line 3 replacement projects. Both of Minnesota’s U.S. Senators would do well to follow his lead and support an override of the President’s Keystone veto.

President Obama’s veto of this legislation is a loss for America, but it doesn’t mean the Keystone XL pipeline is dead. Our nation would benefit from the steady supply of oil it would bring from our most reliable ally, Canada. That’s why Energy Citizens are committed to continuing the fight until the pipeline is approved.

Leave your thoughts

Colorado is Home to 45,000 Miles of Pipeline

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Colorado, Keystone XL Pipeline, Oil Sands

In recent years, we’ve heard a lot about the Keystone XL pipeline proposal. This important infrastructure project will cover nearly 1,200 miles and connect to existing pipelines to carry Canadian oil—and some American-made oil—as far as Texas.

Though it’s a big project, Keystone XL represents less than 1% of our nation’s 150,000 miles of oil pipelines. In addition to oil pipelines, the U.S. has 2.5 million miles of natural gas pipelines. This infrastructure is critical to our economy and way of life—across the nation and throughout Colorado.

In fact, Colorado has about 45,000 miles of pipelines all across the state. Every day, they safely transport natural gas, crude oil, and other types of fuel to homes and businesses. Many of us can easily heat our homes and cook our meals because of pipelines.

Pipelines are among the safest ways to transport fuel, and pipeline operations are tightly regulated by both the Office of Pipeline Safety within the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Gas Pipeline Safety Section of the Colorado Public Utilities Commission.

The greatest hazard related to pipelines comes not from their operation, but from improper and unauthorized digging that damages pipelines. Fortunately, markers, maps, and a dedicated call centers (just dial 811) help excavators and others locate pipelines and prevent damage.

Pipeline operators maintain safe systems by following exacting procedures and employing a range of advanced technologies. Pipelines are built to strict codes, using construction procedures established by federal regulations. Training, construction materials, and inspection all help prevent corrosion, mechanical failure, and human error.

In the coming years, Colorado will need to continue expanding its pipeline infrastructure. New homes for our growing population will require natural gas lines. In addition, a more robust pipeline infrastructure will help our energy sector continue to expand, creating jobs and benefiting local economies.

Safe pipelines will continue to be a cornerstone of American energy. Yes, our nation needs the Keystone XL pipeline. But we need to maintain and expand our pipeline infrastructure here in Colorado as well.

###

Leave your thoughts

Do We Need Duplicate Methane Emission Rules?

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Colorado, Hydraulic Fracturing, Natural Gas, Oil Sands

Last year, Colorado adopted the nation’s first-ever methane emission rules on energy production. Truth be told, well before these rules were adopted, energy companies had already made substantial progress in reducing methane emissions. This conclusion is borne out in a recent report from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

According to the EPA report, even while natural gas production across the nation has increased by 26% since 2005, methane emissions resulting from this activity have fallen 38%. At fracked natural gas wells, emissions are down nearly 79%.

Despite this progress, the federal government is rushing to impose new methane emission rules on energy operations on federal lands. In Colorado, this regulatory proposal is not only unneeded, but it closely duplicates the state’s new methane emission rules.

The fact is, methane is the main component of natural gas. It is in the interest of energy companies to invest in technologies and practices that capture methane. These market incentives—not “check-the-box” regulations—are what will lead to further emissions reduction.

It’s important as well to understand methane emissions in the larger context of greenhouse gases. Methane from oil and natural gas operations combined accounts for less than one-half of one percent of all greenhouse gas emissions.

The alarmist attention to methane emissions from natural gas production also neglects the big-picture benefits delivered by America’s natural gas revolution. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, “About half of that progress we have made [on greenhouse gas emissions] is from the natural-gas boom.” EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy echoed this sentiment, saying, “Natural gas has been a game changer with our ability to really move forward with pollution reductions that have been very hard to get our arms around for many decades.”

Energy production is already closely monitored and regulated. Through innovation, it has become increasingly efficient and safe. Proposed new federal methane regulations are unneeded and could actually result in less innovation when it comes to methane reduction.

Leave your thoughts

Methane Emissions Continue to Fall—Without New Regulations

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Michigan, Natural Gas, Oil Sands

Even as natural gas production has increased in Michigan and across the nation, methane emissions have declined substantially—according to a recent report from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). All told, methane emissions from natural gas production have fallen 38% since 2005, while gas production has increased 26%. In the same period, methane emissions specifically from fracked natural gas wells are down nearly 79%.

Why, then, is the federal government in such a rush to impose new methane rules on energy operations?

The fact is, ethane is the main component of natural gas. It is in the interest of energy companies to invest in technologies and practices that capture methane. There are plenty of market incentives to prevent methane emissions. Those—not “check-the-box” regulations—are what will lead to further emissions reductions.

It’s important as well to understand methane emissions in the larger context of greenhouse gases. Methane from oil and natural gas operations combined accounts for less than one-half of one percent of all greenhouse gas emissions.

The alarmist attention to methane emissions from natural gas production also neglects the big-picture benefits delivered by America’s natural gas revolution. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, “About half of that progress we have made [on greenhouse gas emissions] is from the natural-gas boom.” EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy echoed this sentiment, saying, “Natural gas has been a game changer with our ability to really move forward with pollution reductions that have been very hard to get our arms around for many decades.”

Energy production is already closely monitored and regulated. Through innovation, it has become increasingly efficient and safe. Proposed new federal methane regulations are unneeded and could actually result in less innovation when it comes to methane reduction.

Leave your thoughts

Bipartisan Push to End the Ethanol Mandate

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Natural Gas, Oil Sands, Virginia

Few issues seem to unite members of Congress across party lines. One of the few that does is opposition to the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives, as well as a diverse group of organizations ranging from hunger advocates to poultry farmers to environmentalists oppose this law.

Rep. Bob Goodlatte has been a stalwart opponent of the Renewable Fuel Standard. He’s doing his best to end the law that’s imposing an unwanted ethanol mandate on the American people. The Staunton News-Leader praises him for teaming up with Senator Dianne Feinstein of California on these efforts:

Approximately 40 percent of the corn grown in the United States is used in ethanol production. This inflates food prices, hurts small engines and in some vehicles, cuts gas mileage. Goodlatte rightly calls the corn ethanol mandate a “kitchen table issue.”

Feinstein, meanwhile, believes that without the corn ethanol mandate, RFS can focus on fuels that better reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

It’s good to see members of Congress like Rep. Goodlatte and Sen. Feinstein working across party lines to fix this broken policy. Energy Citizens have been active in the fight against the RFS. Let’s ensure that Congress repeals the RFS in 2015!

Leave your thoughts

Lets Thank Shale for New Jobs in America

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: National, Natural Gas, Oil Sands, States

Recent news indicates that more Americans are being put to work after years of sluggish job growth. Writing in the Investor’s Business Daily, Stephen Moore and Kathleen Hartnett White discuss how American energy production should get much of the credit for this job growth:

“The shale oil and gas revolution is behind the fall in gasoline and electricity prices, which in turn is unleashing a comeback in many industries. Consider the U.S. manufacturing boom, which can be seen in the revival of factories selling everything from plastics, cars and chemicals to potato and micro chips.

“The turnaround has little to do with government programs or subsidies. A major springboard is the lowest-in-the-world energy prices found here in America.

Fracking has unleashed an energy bounty in the United States. That has helped consumers, workers, and businesses throughout the nation. It’s vital that Energy Citizens continue fighting for policies that ensure the shale revolution continues going strong.

Tags:
Leave your thoughts

A Good Vote on the Keystone XL Pipeline

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Keystone XL Pipeline, Minnesota, Oil Sands

When Congress considered legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline, Rep. Rick Nolan joined with a bipartisan majority to support this much-needed project. In the pages of the Park Rapids Enterprise, David Collins expresses his appreciation for this vote:

I should add that the Keystone project itself would support some 40,000 good jobs throughout the central United States – and operate under strict EPA rules and regulations. I commend Congressman Nolan for his sensible position on pipelines in general, and on Keystone in particular. And I would hope that this position and support would extend to the proposed Sandpiper and Line 3 replacement projects. Both of Minnesota’s U.S. Senators would do well to follow his lead and support an override of the President’s Keystone veto.

President Obama’s veto of this legislation is a loss for America, but it doesn’t mean the Keystone XL pipeline is dead. Our nation would benefit from the steady supply of oil it would bring from our most reliable ally, Canada. That’s why Energy Citizens are committed to continuing the fight until the pipeline is approved.

Leave your thoughts

EPA chief McCarthy right on Keystone XL, but doesn't go far enough

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: National, Oil Sands

You might have seen recent news reports of EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy’s statement that the Keystone XL pipeline would not – as critics have long avowed – be a “disaster for the climate.”

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce agreed with her comments, but didn’t think she went as far as she could have on that line of thought.  They pointed out the evidence that shows that Keystone XL, in addition to having no significant impact on the environment, is the best alternative to transporting North American crude oil.

Their argument makes sense.  As Chamber research shows, pipelines are one of the safest and cleanest ways to transport oil and natural gas.

Energy Citizens appreciates Administrator McCarthy’s statement about Keystone XL.  And, like the Chamber, we hope that President Obama will listen to her, take a hard look at the facts, and give this pipeline the approval it deserves.

Leave your thoughts