STEM Education and the Future of Energy Jobs


Categorized in: Jobs, STEM, Texas

It’s no secret that the energy sector has hit a rough patch. In 2015, the industry lost an estimated 250,000 jobs nationwide, and many Texas companies are scaling back operations.

But even in this downturn, the Houston Business Journal reported that GE Oil and Gas—the energy arm of multinational industrial giant GE—is hiring aggressively. GE Oil and Gas recognizes the long-term strength of the industry—and the company is investing in its ability to improve oil and natural gas operations through technology and data analysis.

“We’re investing in unique and different kinds of data professionals,” Jody Markopoulos, COO of GE Oil and Gas, told the Houston Business Journal. “They come from all walks of life… It might be someone from a marketing [background] who understands the price of oil, or it might be someone from technology who understands the design practices and principles.”

STEM Education is Critical to Energy

The energy sector could add another 1.3 million jobs by 2030, with tens of thousands of positions opening up in Texas. Many of these jobs will require advanced training and education in STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and math.

Experts in software development and data analysis will be central to improving energy operations. In addition, engineers, geologists, chemists, and other scientific personnel will help advance America’s energy industry—and enable our nation to continue to be the world’s leading energy producer.

Fortunately, Texas has a strong educational system, with many great K-12 school districts, strong community colleges, and top-tier universities. Now we need to encourage young people to pursue college degrees and community college certifications in STEM fields—and set their sights on a career in the energy sector.

STEM Education Provides a Path to a Career in Energy

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Categorized in: Jobs, Michigan, STEM

America’s energy industry is growing for the long term—in Michigan and around the country. Today, the energy sector supports about 9.8 million American employees—and another 2.3 million energy jobs could be added by 2035. There are opportunities today and on the horizon for Michiganders.

But what’s the best way to position yourself for a career in energy? The answer lies in education – namely, STEM education: science, technology, engineering, and math.

Like other industries, such as the auto industry, energy is increasingly driven by technology. Software and advanced data analysis continually improves energy operations. Precision equipment and engineering are also central to the industry. All of this requires scientific and technical expertise.

Earning a college degree in a STEM field takes a lot of hard work, but the rewards of employment in the energy industry can be well worth it. In Michigan, the average annual salary in the oil and gas sector exceeds $75,000. Nationally, among all engineers, petroleum engineers earn the highest salary, averaging more than $130,000 a year.

Of course not everyone wants or has the opportunity to pursue a 4-year college degree. You can still position yourself for a career in energy by earning a STEM associate degree or appropriate certification from a community college.

Even if you’re already set in your own career, Energy Citizens are encouraged to highlight to young people—especially college-bound students—the opportunities in the energy sector.

STEM Education Provides a Path to a Career in Energy

Leave your thoughts
Categorized in: Michigan, STEM

America’s energy industry is growing for the long term—in Michigan and around the country. Today, the energy sector supports about 9.8 million American employees—and another 1.3 million energy jobs could be added by 2030. There are opportunities today and on the horizon for Michiganders.

But what’s the best way to position yourself for a career in energy? The answer lies in education – namely, STEM education: science, technology, engineering, and math.

Like other industries, such as the auto industry, energy is increasingly driven by technology. Software and advanced data analysis continually improves energy operations. Precision equipment and engineering are also central to the industry. All of this requires scientific and technical expertise.

Earning a college degree in a STEM field takes a lot of hard work, but the rewards of employment in the energy industry can be well worth it. In Michigan, the average annual salary in the oil and gas sector exceeds $75,000. Nationally, among all engineers, petroleum engineers earn the highest salary, averaging more than $130,000 a year.

Of course not everyone wants or has the opportunity to pursue a 4-year college degree. You can still position yourself for a career in energy by earning a STEM associate degree or appropriate certification from a community college.

Even if you’re already set in your own career, Energy Citizens are encouraged to highlight to young people—especially college-bound students—the opportunities in the energy sector.