Ivey Site is an Example of Energy Development at its Best


Categorized in: blogrightrails, Colorado, Hydraulic Fracturing, Infrastructure, National

Adams County Commissioners will soon be considering whether to allow energy development at the Ivey site in the northwest corner of the county. This will be a safe, well-regulated project that will deliver enormous economic benefits to the region. But make no mistake: anti-energy activists will try to stop this project with fear, intimidation, and misinformation

The Ivey site development is an example of energy development at its best. It will contribute to America’s energy supply while helping the local community. Homes, schools, and parks are situated well outside the setback requirements for energy development at the Ivey site. The project will rely on pipelines, not trucks, for removing and transporting developed resources. This will help control traffic around the site. In addition, a solid emergency response plan has been developed, with support from local officials.

In addition to supporting jobs, the Ivey site will contribute more than $76 million in tax revenues over the life of the project. These funds can help improve our schools, libraries, parks, and government services.

It would be a mistake to sacrifice the opportunities of the Ivey site project for the unjustified fears promoted by anti-energy activists. Adams County Commissioners should support this sensible, local energy development.

Illinois Policymakers Need to Embrace Expanding Energy Infrastructure


Categorized in: blogrightrails, Illinois, Infrastructure

The United States is an energy-rich country, but the full benefits of energy production cannot be realized without the right infrastructure to transport and store it. From pipelines to storage facilities to refineries to ports, Illinois’s policymakers need to embrace expanding the infrastructure that supports oil and natural gas development in the Land of Lincoln.

Pipeline companies work with Illinois’s local and state governments, as well as the federal government, to address community health, safety, security, and environmental concerns throughout every phase of a pipeline’s development and operation. Pipeline plans are approved before construction starts, and pipelines are inspected regularly during the building and throughout their operational lifetime.

Former EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said, “Natural gas has been a game-changer with our ability to really move forward with pollution reductions that have been very hard to get our arms around for decades.” As the demand for natural gas grows in Illinois, so does the need to build and expand our pipeline system. Building these important infrastructure projects could lower heating and electricity costs, create jobs and improve our economy.

By lowering energy costs, growing the economy, creating jobs, and helping the environment, natural gas has done a lot for Illinois. It can do even more to benefit us if energy infrastructure can be expanded to keep up with consumer demand. I hope our policymakers don’t let a small band of activists stand in the way of much-needed pipelines and other infrastructure projects.

Pipelines: Helping Make All Your Halloween Fun Possible


Categorized in: blogrightrails, Infrastructure, National

Halloween is here! Whether you are handing out candy, attending a party, or out trick-or-treating, pipelines make Halloween possible.

The costumes, face paint and hair dye that make Halloween unique are all made from oil and natural gas, and delivered through pipelines. Take for instance, the wrappers around Halloween candy – they are often made from plastic, which is created from oil. The same goes for the stretchable fabrics like polyester that weave together your favorite costumes. Without the millions of miles of existing pipelines in the United States that deliver energy safely and efficiently, many of these great Halloween products wouldn’t exist.

It’s safe to say, Halloween wouldn’t be the same without pipelines to make our favorite products possible. And without pipelines, life as we know it would be pretty scary!  

Click here to learn more about the ways energy infrastructure make life possible year round.

Support Minnesota Line 3


Categorized in: blogrightrails, Infrastructure, Minnesota, National

A pipeline known as Line 3 has been delivering energy safely and efficiently to Minnesota for over 50 years. The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission is currently holding a public comment period to receive feedback on this project. 

It is now time to look toward the future and build a replacement pipeline so Minnesota residents have access to affordable and reliable energy in the years to come. Along with improving our energy infrastructure and safety standards, this project will also support good-paying jobs, provide a boost for local economies, and increase tax revenue for public services.

 

Picking one type of energy over another can hurt the environment


Categorized in: Infrastructure, National

With anti-pipeline protests much in the news lately, Robert Bryce, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, recently published a guest op-ed that points out how self-proclaimed environmentalists who oppose oil and gas pipelines as part of their “keep it in the ground” strategy may very well be doing more ecological harm than good.

“The Anti-Pipeline Anti-Environmentalists” explains how plans to completely switch to so-called “clean energy” instead of oil and natural gas could wreak land use havoc:

Climate activists are now hoping to block oil and gas pipeline projects across the country due to their claim that we must keep all hydrocarbons in the ground to avert catastrophic climate change. Those same activists repeatedly claim we don’t need fossil fuels because we can rely solely on wind and solar energy.

But while they obsess over our carbon footprint, climate activists don’t give a fig about the land-use footprint of renewables. Indeed, the dirty truth about “clean” energy is that it requires shocking amounts of land. In a recent report for the Manhattan Institute, I show that using wind and solar energy to reduce domestic carbon dioxide emissions by 80% by 2050 (80 by 50) will require covering about 287,700 square miles of territory — an area about the size of Texas and West Virginia combined.

Energy Citizens have been making similar points for years. Selectively choosing one energy resource over another never works. Our lifestyles depend on a commonsense mix of all forms of energy, the “all of the above” energy strategy that should be the goal of U.S. energy policies.

It’s up to us to keep reminding decision-makers in state and federal government to support energy policies – such as the reasonable use of pipelines – that will supply us with the energy we need.

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Why Florida Needs More Pipelines


Categorized in: Florida, Infrastructure, Natural Gas

Pipelines bring affordable, clean energy. That’s the simple message that Energy Citizens need to tell our fellow Floridians.

There are plans to build new pipelines in our state. Unfortunately, a committed band of activists are trying to stop this investment in Florida’s energy infrastructure. We can’t afford to let extremists stand in the way of these much-needed projects.

One of those pipelines is the Sabal Trail. Andrea Grover of Sabal Trail explains its importance in the Tallahassee Democrat:

Current natural gas pipeline infrastructure in Florida isn’t adequate to meet increased demand for natural gas. This is why Florida Power & Light (FPL) and Duke Energy back the Sabal Trail pipeline.

Their goal is to lower emissions, provide clean natural gas-fueled power plants and decrease customer bills. As one of the largest projects under construction in the industry, both FPL and Duke Energy will receive stable, reliable and low-cost natural gas supply from Sabal Trail.

FPL needs Sabal Trail to provide fuel for its natural gas-fueled power plants. The company has shut down several oil- and coal-fueled power plants and invested in new, highly efficient clean energy centers, saving its customers billions in fuel costs while reducing carbon emissions.

While Ms. Grover is talking about the Sabal Trail project, she could really be talking about any new pipeline. America is in the midst of an energy renaissance, and while we are currently the world’s top producer of natural gas, we need more infrastructures to maintain the US role as an energy superpower. Specific to Floridians, local consumers can’t take advantage of the benefits that America’s abundant natural gas will bring unless we expand the state’s energy infrastructure.

Let’s make sure that Energy Citizens get the word out about the importance of new pipelines this year.

The Strong Safety Record of Pipelines


Categorized in: Colorado, Infrastructure, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, National, New England, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, Wisconsin

Pipelines have been in the news a lot lately. While activists trying to shut down new pipeline projects make wild claims about their safety, the scientific facts prove the opposite.

  • To prevent leaks, state-of-the-art technology similar to a doctor’s ultrasound machine or MRI is used on the inside of the pipe to scan the walls for any potential problems. In 2012 alone, $2.1 billion was spent by liquid pipeline operators to evaluate, inspect and maintain their pipelines.
  • Liquid pipeline incidents are down 50% since 1999.
  • Corrosion as a cause of pipeline incidents is down 76% since 1999.

Lawmakers and regulators should not be misled by false claims about pipelines. The industry’s commitment to safety through best practices and with the use of modern technology allows companies to ensure that pipelines deliver energy products safely 99.99% of the time. They are also needed to ensure that consumers have access to clean, affordable energy in the years to come. In the debate over expanding our energy infrastructure and greater natural gas use, it’s vital that we keep politics aside and instead focus on the long-term benefits for our country that take the form of lower energy prices, greater job creation, and environmental benefits.

Understanding Infrastructure


Categorized in: Colorado, Infrastructure, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, National, New England, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin

If we don’t understand how oil and natural gas get from the wellhead to the consumers or commercial users, we don’t understand energy. Energy infrastructure – pipelines, roads, bridges, rail lines, processing plants, storage facilities, etc. – enables us to maintain and even grow the lifestyle that we have today. Today, we need to devote just as much time to learning about – and advocating for – energy infrastructure as we do to fracking, offshore resource access, or any of the other major issues that surround U.S. energy security.

To most of us, pipelines are the first thing we imagine when we hear about energy infrastructure. They are critically important to moving both domestically produced and imported fuels that we use every day, and they are essential to transporting the oil and gas by-products that feed the U.S. manufacturing industry. In fact, our country has a robust network of energy pipelines that moves 14 billion barrels of crude oil, among other oil and gas-related products.

But don’t forget that rail cars move oil and liquefied natural gas too. So do trucks. And the processing facilities that prepare natural gas to be used and storage tanks that hold it in reserve for those winter days when we need more energy are all critical oil and gas infrastructure components as well.

Energy infrastructure is a big issue and an important one. This factsheet – Energy Infrastructure 101 – is a good place to start finding out about infrastructure and understanding why it is so important to our nation.

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URGENT ACTION VIRGINIA: Oppose Anti-Energy Amendments


Categorized in: Infrastructure, Jobs, Virginia

Governor McAuliffe and anti-energy agitators are pushing burdensome new regulations in the state legislature that are meant to stop Virginia energy development. They would add new layers of red tape and regulation, resulting in economic harm, lost jobs, and even higher energy costs.

Because this issue is advancing fast, please email your Virginia Senator now.

We must oppose the loud voices of radical anti-energy activists who are pushing their agenda in Richmond. It’s critical that Virginia Energy Citizens stand up for local energy development.

We must oppose the loud voices of radical anti-energy activists who are pushing their agenda in Richmond. It’s critical that our industry workforce stand up for safe energy development here in Virginia.

Energy Infrastructure for Michigan Manufacturing


Categorized in: Infrastructure, Jobs, Michigan, Natural Gas

To grow our economy and maintain our quality of life, we need to ensure that energy supplies can reach us reliably and affordably well into the future. That’s why it’s critical that Michiganders recognize the need for current and expanded energy infrastructure.

Michigan’s Antrim Shale is the source of some of our oil and natural gas, but ultimately we must bring in most of our energy from other areas. We are an intensive user of energy, not only because of our cold winters, but also because of our strong manufacturing sector.

Every business needs power—and for some businesses, the price of energy can be the difference between success and failure. Auto, chemical, glass, and paper manufacturing—all strong industries in Michigan—use a lot of power. For these industries to continue thriving, they need dependable fuel supplies made possible by sufficient energy infrastructure.

In addition, chemical manufacturing depends on natural gas and petroleum products as building blocks. Without adequate energy infrastructure, we could see chemical companies looking at expansion opportunities—out of state.

The elections, as well as post-election discussions, have brought renewed focus on the need to invest in our nation’s infrastructure. This year, we’re likely to see increased federal support for building and improving roads, bridges, airports, and rail. Pipelines and other energy infrastructure should also be on the table.

Energy infrastructure investment will come from the private sector—so no taxpayer dollars will be needed. But for these projects to move forward, we need the support of local, state, and federal officials. The engaged voices of Michigan Energy Citizens can help make it happen.