The Severance Tax is Bad for PA


Categorized in: Pennsylvania

Check out the this letter to the editor recently posted in the Pocono Record

Here we go again — some of the legislature and the governor may be considering another energy tax again. In December 2017, there was another failed push for an energy tax. So, you can bet they will try again. Gov. Tom Wolf will surely be calling for a severance tax among other things in his budget. Why? Because he can’t balance a budget and now wants to grab on to taxes already paid by the energy industry and add them to the black hole.

Pennsylvania has a severance tax — which is called an impact tax — and it has provided more than $1 billion, the bulk of which goes to all 67 counties throughout Pennsylvania since 2012. A new energy tax, if passed, could change how the impact tax is collected and distributed. It would go into the black hole. A new energy tax means tax revenue controlled by and through Harrisburg.

 

Read the rest of  Josephine Ferro’s piece here

Severance Tax Could Cost Jobs in Pennsylvania


Categorized in: Pennsylvania

Have you seen the recent Letter to the Editor in the Erie Times News?  It makes some great points about how the Severance tax would hurt job growth in Pennsylvania.

Gov. Tom Wolf, who is running for re-election, is again proposing to levy a severance tax statewide on energy producers. This proposal would replace the currently existing impact fees. Natural gas drillers pay tens of thousands of dollars on each new well, and those funds go to compensate local counties and municipalities, generating revenue that is reinvested by counties and townships in things such as paving roads or buying municipal equipment. Since Act 13 was passed in 2012, impact fees have brought in more than $1.2 billion to Pennsylvania, 60 percent of which went directly to counties and townships. Other funds went into state agencies and programs.

Severance taxes would be based on how much energy is produced via extraction. Nearly 20,000 Pennsylvanians are directly employed in the oil and gas industry, and more than 200,000 are employed in ancillary industries such as steel, road construction and trucking. The severance tax would be detrimental to economic growth and job creation in our state.

 

Read the complete piece by Robert J. Yates here.

Pennsylvania Energy Keeps America From Dependency


Categorized in: Pennsylvania

Look at what Don Schreiber contributed to Bill Lawrence Online.

We are producing more natural gas then we ever had before and that is great news for Pennsylvania and its residents.  Jobs are being created, industries are growing and revenue is increasing because of the natural gas industry.  Even all our counties receive money directly from an industry severance tax for environmental use to create park space and other quality of life activities that makes us proud to live in our communities.

And, natural gas even helps reduce pollution. Former EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said, “Natural gas has been a game-changer with our ability to really move forward with pollution reductions that have been very hard to get our arms around for decades.”
Don makes some great points about the importance of energy independence in Pennsylvania, and how the proposed severance tax would make us energy dependent. Read his complete piece here. 

Keep the Heat on this Winter


Categorized in: blogrightrails, Delaware, National, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania

Winter is the time when many of us learn to appreciate natural gas even more. Thanks to natural gas, the parts of our country that have been experiencing extreme weather conditions are able to heat their homes and keep local businesses open.

Unfortunately, some regulators don’t share the same opinion about this low-cost heating source. They are trying to shut down safe natural gas production in the Delaware River basin.

We need to tell the Delaware River Basin Commission to support affordable energy.

Members of the Delaware River Basin Commission are taking public comments on rules that would make a huge area off-limits to shale gas development. These rules would hurt efforts to produce the natural gas that keeps our energy costs low during winter and the rest of the year.

Let’s tell the commissioners that it’s unfair and unnecessary to ban natural gas development.

 

Preventing Needless Energy Taxes in Pennsylvania


Categorized in: National, Pennsylvania, Taxes

Time is not on our side. With a state budget that’s more than two months overdue, the House has returned to figure out how to balance the budget and fund our state. We must act now. Tell your representative that taxing Pennsylvania energy is not the answer to Harrisburg’s spending. Stop the severance tax today!

 

The governor and his allies don’t seem to care that this is a dangerous tax scheme that could threaten tens of thousands of good-paying jobs, put affordable energy for Pennsylvania families at risk, and threaten America’s energy security.

 

Pennsylvania should not be subjected to a new tax to fund Governor Wolf’s big spending plans. We have to let our representatives know that this energy tax would harm Pennsylvania families.

It’s Time to Fix the Renewable Fuel Standard


Categorized in: Colorado, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, National, New England, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, RFS, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) was supposedly created to help address environmental concerns. However its negative impacts on the American people and its unrealistic mandates produce more damaging effects than benefits.

Damaging Cars: Ethanol blends of more than 10% potentially could damage millions of vehicles and void engine warranties. Many cars, especially ones created before this mandate weren’t designed to accommodate ethanol blends, especially ones over 10%.

Increased Food Cost: The RFS ultimately takes away crops that would normally be used for food. This can cause the price of food and consumer goods to increase.

Hurting Small Business: An ethanol mandate can lead to overhead and delivery cost increases. This would cause a negative chain reaction leaving less money to be reinvested, resulting in small businesses struggling to find the funds to make new hires or even meet payrolls.

The RFS biofuel mandates are causing more harm than good and it needs to be fixed!

The Strong Safety Record of Pipelines


Categorized in: Colorado, Infrastructure, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, National, New England, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, Wisconsin

Pipelines have been in the news a lot lately. While activists trying to shut down new pipeline projects make wild claims about their safety, the scientific facts prove the opposite.

  • To prevent leaks, state-of-the-art technology similar to a doctor’s ultrasound machine or MRI is used on the inside of the pipe to scan the walls for any potential problems. In 2012 alone, $2.1 billion was spent by liquid pipeline operators to evaluate, inspect and maintain their pipelines.
  • Liquid pipeline incidents are down 50% since 1999.
  • Corrosion as a cause of pipeline incidents is down 76% since 1999.

Lawmakers and regulators should not be misled by false claims about pipelines. The industry’s commitment to safety through best practices and with the use of modern technology allows companies to ensure that pipelines deliver energy products safely 99.99% of the time. They are also needed to ensure that consumers have access to clean, affordable energy in the years to come. In the debate over expanding our energy infrastructure and greater natural gas use, it’s vital that we keep politics aside and instead focus on the long-term benefits for our country that take the form of lower energy prices, greater job creation, and environmental benefits.

Fix the Renewable Fuel Standard


Categorized in: Colorado, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, National, New England, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, RFS, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin

The Houston Chronicle ran an editorial that urges the next administration and Congress to take a hard look at what the newspaper calls the “ethanol happy hour.” In Blended fuels: The fuel standard has created unintended consequences and is ripe for overhaul Chronicle editors write that one thing has gone unnoticed – the blend wall:

That figurative barrier is called the blend wall – the threshold beyond which the U.S. gasoline supply contains more than 10 percent ethanol. Oil industry and small government advocates point to the wall in criticizing the Renewable Fuel Standard, a decade-old law requiring an increasing volume of ethanol and other renewable liquids in the nation’s fuel supply.

Automakers say they can’t guarantee that any but a few of their engines will run properly on mixes of less than 90 percent gasoline, and many fuel suppliers say it’s difficult and expensive to comply with the federal mandate.

Renewable Fuel Standard biofuel mandates could cause a lot of problems, among them potential economic harm. Like the Chronicle, Energy Citizens believes the RFS needs to be fixed.

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Brought to You by Fracking


Categorized in: Colorado, Hydraulic Fracturing, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, National, New England, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin

Energy Citizens should take a minute to check out the blog over at the Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for 21st Century Energy. There is a great post that discusses the importance of fracking to our everyday lives:

America is at an energy crossroads. The fracking-enabled shale revolution is rapidly transforming the nation’s energy landscape, lowering prices for consumers and dramatically reducing our dependence on foreign oil.

Energy is everywhere, and if you stop for a moment to look around you, chances are you will see countless goods and services that are “Brought To You By Fracking.” We’re not just talking about gasoline for your car and electricity for your house—everything from health care and housing to hamburgers and hula hoops are impacted by the price and availability of energy, and oil and natural gas in particular. As a result, the practical impact if the “keep it in the ground” movement succeeds would hurt every American’s quality of life.

The blog goes on to discuss some of the things that are made possible by fracking – air travel, gasoline, air conditioning, and electricity. We may not realize just how important fracking is to our daily lives, but its influence is enormous.

We can’t let anti-energy activists succeed in their war on fracking. We have to speak out in defense of this safe, time-tested practice. The American energy revolution would not exist without it.

Understanding Infrastructure


Categorized in: Colorado, Infrastructure, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, National, New England, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin

If we don’t understand how oil and natural gas get from the wellhead to the consumers or commercial users, we don’t understand energy. Energy infrastructure – pipelines, roads, bridges, rail lines, processing plants, storage facilities, etc. – enables us to maintain and even grow the lifestyle that we have today. Today, we need to devote just as much time to learning about – and advocating for – energy infrastructure as we do to fracking, offshore resource access, or any of the other major issues that surround U.S. energy security.

To most of us, pipelines are the first thing we imagine when we hear about energy infrastructure. They are critically important to moving both domestically produced and imported fuels that we use every day, and they are essential to transporting the oil and gas by-products that feed the U.S. manufacturing industry. In fact, our country has a robust network of energy pipelines that moves 14 billion barrels of crude oil, among other oil and gas-related products.

But don’t forget that rail cars move oil and liquefied natural gas too. So do trucks. And the processing facilities that prepare natural gas to be used and storage tanks that hold it in reserve for those winter days when we need more energy are all critical oil and gas infrastructure components as well.

Energy infrastructure is a big issue and an important one. This factsheet – Energy Infrastructure 101 – is a good place to start finding out about infrastructure and understanding why it is so important to our nation.

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